Last edited by Kezil
Friday, May 8, 2020 | History

7 edition of Helping friends and harming enemies found in the catalog.

Helping friends and harming enemies

Ruby Blondell

Helping friends and harming enemies

a study in Sophocles and Greek ethics

by Ruby Blondell

  • 224 Want to read
  • 3 Currently reading

Published by Cambridge University Press in Cambridge [England], New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Sophocles -- Ethics,
  • Didactic drama, Greece -- History and criticism,
  • Mythology, Greek, in literature,
  • Ethics, Ancient, in literature,
  • Ethics, Ancient

  • Edition Notes

    StatementMary Whitlock Blundell.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsPA4417 .B54 1989
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxii, 298 p. ;
    Number of Pages298
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL2039474M
    ISBN 100521351162
    LC Control Number88015971

    Socrates: I believe that Periander or Perdiccas or Xerxes or Ismenias the Theban, or some other rich and mighty man, who had a great opinion of his own power, was the first to say that justice is 'doing good to your friends and harm to your enemies.' Polemarchus: Most true, he said.   Then Polemarchus says that Justice is helping friends and harming enemies. According to this statement, Socrates says that stealing would be just as long as it is helping friends and harming friends. You should check out some good guides.

    "Help your friends, harm your enemies." I have heard this was a motto of Roman life and foreign policy. It is the definition of justice that begins the discussion in Plato's Republic.I believe that the inscription on Cato's tomb was something like, "No man did more to help his friends or harm his enemies.". As it is never the function of heat to cool things, so we must recognize that it is never the function of a just man to harm someone. Thus it cannot possibly be the proper function of a just man to harm his enemies. So Simonides could never have said that it is just to help your friends and harm your enemies, could he!

    The Open MindHost: Richard D. HeffnerGuest: Jane Hamilton-MerrittVTR: 9/22/93“Rewarding Out Friends and Punishing Our Enemies” I’m Richard Heffner, your host on The Open Mind. And I . Polemarchus, Thrasymachus, Glaucon and Socrates: Conflicting Perspectives in Plato's Republic I and II. Revised Octo This web page was originally prepared for use in an Introduction to Philosophy Course that spent up to five weeks on Plato's may also be of use to students who are reading parts of the Republic in other contexts.


Share this book
You might also like
Mobilization of civilian manpower

Mobilization of civilian manpower

Health resources and needs in south central Montana

Health resources and needs in south central Montana

Toward the comparative study of public administration.

Toward the comparative study of public administration.

Innovaciones en el sistema de salud de América Central

Innovaciones en el sistema de salud de América Central

The Return of History and the End of Dreams

The Return of History and the End of Dreams

The Tintin poster book.

The Tintin poster book.

Doing business in the PTA/COMESA

Doing business in the PTA/COMESA

Queer beauty

Queer beauty

EMED

EMED

Neill and Co.s typographic guide

Neill and Co.s typographic guide

Introduction to Macrobiotics

Introduction to Macrobiotics

Presentation of Self

Presentation of Self

legends of Troy in art and literature.

legends of Troy in art and literature.

Helping friends and harming enemies by Ruby Blondell Download PDF EPUB FB2

This book is the first detailed study of the plays of Sophocles through examination of a single ethical principle--the traditional Greek popular moral code of "helping friends and harming enemies."Cited by: Sophocles has traditionally been considered the least philosophical of the three great Greek tragedians, but Professor Whitlock Blundell offers an important new examination of the ethical content of the plays by focusing primarily on the traditional Greek popular moral code of 'helping friends and harming enemies'.Cited by: This book is the first detailed study of the plays of Sophocles through examination of a single ethical principle--the traditional Greek popular moral code of "helping friends and harming enemies.".

Helping Friends and Harming Enemies - by Mary Whitlock Blundell February Skip to main content Accessibility help We use cookies to distinguish you from other users and to provide you with a better experience on our websites.

Close this message to. Helping friends and harming enemies: the case of Gorgias a6–b5. Sophocles has traditionally been Helping friends and harming enemies book the least philosophical of the three great Greek tragedians, but Professor Whitlock Blundell offers an important new examination of the ethical content of the plays by focusing primarily on the traditional Greek popular moral code of 'helping friends and harming enemies'.

First off, Field's book is very different from Harry Potter. Actually, it speaks to an older, more mature teenager. Tommy, the protagonist in Friends & Enemies, for example, has a very different feeling toward girls in this story than Harry has in his/5(7). Socrates first convinces Polemarchus to change his definition of justice from benefiting friends (apparent friends) and harming enemies (apparent enemies) to benefiting good people (true friends) and harming bad people (true enemies); for the mark of a true friend is goodness, the mark of a true enemy is badness, apparent friends are not always true friends, and apparent enemies are not always.

Sophocles has traditionally been considered the least philosophical of the three great Greek tragedians, but Professor Whitlock Blundell offers an important new examination of the ethical content of the plays by focusing primarily on the traditional Greek popular moral code of 'helping friends and harming enemies'.4/5(1).

[ ] [T]he maxim “Help your friends, harm your enemies” stares out at us from the pages of the poets. It is to be found in Archilochus, in Solon, in.

"Friends and Enemies" is based on a combination of research and Brown's own experiences as a business person and diplomat in China, where he lived for seven years.

It has also benefited from the input of analysts of the Party from the UK and US, and from. The first two chapters give an account of the antique Greek principle of conduct summed up in the injunction Help friends and harm enemies.

Now this principle was not only rejected by Socrates, it was demolished by Plato in the Republic, in the early arguments widi Cephalus, Glaucon, and Adeimantus. At the end of his discussion with Polemarchus, Socrates makes a point of claiming that Simonides (or Bias or Pittacus, two of the reputed seven wise men of Greece) ought not be understood as claiming that justice is helping friends and harming enemies.

star Top subjects are Literature, History, and Social Sciences This question appears to be prompted by a reading of Mary Blundell's book Helping Friends and Harming Enemies: A Study in Sophocles. Summary: This book is a detailed study of five plays of Sophocles through examination of a single ethical principle of 'helping friends and harming enemies'.

Greek scholars and students of Greek drama and Greek thought will welcome this book and is accessible to specialists and non-specialists alike. No knowledge of Greek is required. Start studying JUSTICE - Republic Book Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools.

*Justice is HELPING one's friend and HARMING one's enemies. helping friends and harming enemies is not what we do in medicine or in cooking. Friends and Enemies is about a boy named William who left a town in Kansas called Topeka and went to a town named Plaintown. He made a few friends in Plaintown, but most of the people there were his enemies, but he tried to make them his friends/5.

Polemarchus agrees and then argues that justice may be defined as giving everyone what is "appropriate" to him and that it would be unjust to return a sword to a friend who is in a crazed condition.

Then Polemarchus argues that it is appropriate to do good for one's friends and to do harm to one's enemies, and thus is justice attained.

Analysis: “Enemies” & “Friends” In these two brief stories, the pressures of war distort social codes, causing two men on the same side to act violently toward one another for no real reason.

O’Brien explains that this behavior results from the immaturity of Jensen and Strunk, and of the immaturity of grunts in general. Buy By Mary Whitlock Blundell Helping Friends and Harming Enemies: A Study in Sophocles and Greek Ethics (New Ed) New Ed by Mary Whitlock Blundell (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store.

Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible orders.4/5(1). In response to Socrates, who asks how can a just man best help friends and harm enemies, he answers that, in his opinion, “it is in making war and being an ally in battle” (Plato 8).

This justification supports the just man’s intentions in attacking enemies and assisting friends in battle, which promotes reliance among friends and knowing clearly who his friends and enemies are.Judgment in determining friends and enemies is too fallible. We may end up harming the good or helping the bad.

Our friends aren't always going to be great people and our enemies aren't always going to be terrible people. Also, there is an incoherence in harming people through justice.HELPING FRIENDS AND HARMING ENEMIES (e- a) After Cephalus leaves, the discussion becomes more serious and more complex.

Polemarchus carries on his father's argument. But unlike his father he is not concerned with the role of justice in religious matters. Instead, Polemarchus relies on authorities other than the gods or the laws.